FEATURED ARTICLES

Featured

Stories 1 to 5 of 2728
8/21/2014

Tennessee Student Suspended for Saying, “Bless You”

A Dyersburg, Tennessee teenager recently received an “In School Suspension” for attempting to be polite.

A Dyersburg, Tennessee teenager recently received an “In School Suspension” for attempting to be polite.   Kendra Turner, a senior at Dyer County High School located about an hour and half northeast of Memphis, Tennessee, said ‘bless you’ during class on Monday when a fellow classmate sneezed. Turner explains that the phrase is among many that are banned from being spoken during class.   "We're not allowed to say bless you, my bad, hang out, dumb, stupid, stuff, and things like that," Turner told the State Gazette.    The State Gazette also reports Turner’s teacher stood up seeking to know who said the common response to a sneeze.    "She asked why I said it, and I told her I was being courteous and she asked me who told me that it was courtesy?" added Turner. "I told her my pastor and my parents taught me to say it."   The practice of blessing someone who sneezes dates as far back to 77 AD. Following an outbreak of the Bubonic Plague, in 590 AD Pope Gregory I ordered villagers to utter the saying in hopes of fighting off the disease.    Turner reports that she was then instructed to go to the principal’s office. It was there she received the suspension.    On Tuesday, Turner’s church held a press conference where Turner said, "I want God to be able to be talked about in school. I want them to realize that God is in control and they're not. I also ... read more
8/21/2014

Ebola Patients Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol Released from Hospital

Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol have both been released from Emory Hospital, after receiving an experimental Ebola treatment.

Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol have both been released from Emory University Hospital, after receiving an experimental Ebola treatments. Doctors said the release of the missionaries who contracted Ebola while serving in Liberia would pose no threat to the public, as they showed no more signs of the deadly virus.    Bruce Ribner, director of the hospitals Infectious Disease Unit said, "After a rigorous course of treatment and testing, the Emory Healthcare team has determined that both patients have recovered from the Ebola virus and can return to their families and community without concern for spreading this infection to others.”   Nancy Writebol was released on Tuesday (Aug. 19), followed by the released of Brantly today (Aug. 21).    Writebol’s husband David said that the virus took a toll on Nancy and she is in a “significantly weakened condition.” David and Nancy Writebol are now resting privately in an undisclosed location.    Brantly, a Samaritan’s Purse doctor said, “I am forever thankful to God for sparing my life.”    Ribner said that the "key to surviving Ebola is aggressive supportive care.” Unfortunately, hospitals in western Africa have limited medical resources for such a deadly, contagious virus.    Doctors remain uncertain if the experimental treatments that Brantly and Writebol received are to be credited for their recoveries.     Publication date: August 21, 2014 read more
8/21/2014

China to Pope Francis: Don’t ‘Interfere’ with Religion

China has reacted cautiously to a bid by Pope Francis to open new dialogue with Beijing, with some officials quick to warn the Vatican not to “interfere” with the country’s religion.

China has reacted cautiously to a bid by Pope Francis to open new dialogue with Beijing, with some officials quick to warn the Vatican not to “interfere” with the country’s religion.   On his return flight from a five-day tour of South Korea, Francis said he was ready to go to China — “For sure! Tomorrow!” — after receiving a positive response to two goodwill telegrams he sent to President Xi Jinping as the pope flew over Chinese airspace.   “We respect the Chinese people,” Francis told journalists on the return flight Monday (Aug. 18). “The church only asks for liberty for its task, for its work.”   That is still a huge challenge, as the Vatican has not had diplomatic relations with China since 1951. The Catholic Church in China is divided between an “official” church known as the Catholic Patriotic Association, answerable to the Communist Party, and an underground church that swears allegiance to Rome.   The state-run Catholic Patriotic Association was quick to respond to the pope’s overtures for greater dialogue, albeit with a warning.   “China will always safeguard its sovereignty and territorial integrity and it never allows foreign forces to interfere with religion. The Vatican should respect China in terms of the personnel of a diocese,” Liu Yuanlong, vice president of the association, told the state-run Global Times in a report also published in English.   The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs is unhappy with the Vatican’s diplomatic recognition of Taiwan, while the Vatican is ... read more
8/21/2014

Hunger in America: 1 in 7 Rely on Food Banks

One in seven Americans — 46 million people — rely on food pantries and meal service programs to feed themselves and their families, a study found.

When Mary Smallenburg, 35, of Fort Belvoir, Va., opened a package from her mother to find cereal and ramen noodles, she burst into tears. Without it, she wouldn’t be able to feed her four children.   “It got to the point where I opened my pantry and there was nothing. Nothing. What was I going to feed my kids?” Smallenburg said, adjusting a bag of fresh groceries on her arm.   Smallenburg’s family is one of 50 military families that regularly visit the Lorton Community Action Center food bank. Volunteers wave a familiar hello as she walks in the door.   “None of what we have been through has been expected,” Smallenburg said. Three of her four children have special needs, and her husband is deployed in Korea. “The last few months, actually, coming here has been a godsend.”   Nationwide, 25 percent of military families — 620,000 households — need help putting food on the table, according to a study by Feeding America, a network of 200 food banks.   “The results are alarming,” said Bob Aiken, chief executive officer of Feeding America. “It means that people in America have to make trade-offs. They have to pick between buying food for their children or paying for utilities, rent and medicine.”   One in seven Americans — 46 million people — rely on food pantries and meal service programs to feed themselves and their families, the study found.   “Hunger exists in literally every county in America,” Aiken said. “It’s ... read more
8/21/2014

Brain Imaging Shows Differences in Risk Taking Teens

New research found that connections between certain brain regions are amplified in teens more prone to risk.

New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas investigating brain differences associated with risk-taking teens found that connections between certain brain regions are amplified in teens more prone to risk. "Our brains have an emotional-regulation network that exists to govern emotions and influence decision-making," explained the study's lead author, Sam Dewitt. "Antisocial or risk-seeking behavior may be associated with an imbalance in this network." The study, published in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, looked at 36 adolescents ages 12-17; eighteen risk-taking teens were age- and sex-matched to a group of 18 non-risk-taking teens. Participants were screened for risk-taking behaviors, such as drug and alcohol use, sexual promiscuity, and physical violence and underwent functional MRI (fMRI) scans to examine communication between brain regions associated with the emotional-regulation network. The study shows that risk-taking teens exhibit hyperconnectivity between the amygdala, a center responsible for emotional reactivity, and specific areas of the prefrontal cortex associated with emotion regulation and critical thinking skills. Researchers also found increased activity between areas of the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, a center for reward sensitivity that is often implicated in addiction research. Even though the risk-taking group did partake in risky behavior, none met clinical criteria for behavioral or substance use disorders. "Our findings are crucial in that they help identify potential brain biomarkers that, when taken into context with behavioral differences, may help identify which adolescents are at risk for dangerous and pathological behaviors in the future," Dewitt explained. Source: ScienceCodex... read more